Top quotes on eve of Trump visit

Here is a serving of quotes from the World Economic Forum in Davos on Wednesday , as anticipation grew for the arrival of US President Donald Trump.
“ That’ s a difficult case . It is very difficult to handle that kind of person because they have absolutely no consideration for others. They are so focussed on themselves that they do not listen . ” — Matthieu Ricard , French Buddhist monk and author , on what he would say if he crossed paths at Davos with Donald Trump . Ricard has been encouraging stressed – out delegates to meditate.
“ Obviously a weaker dollar is good for us , it’ s good because it has to do with trade and opportunities. ” — US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, in comments that sent the dollar plummeting and were seen as a green light from Washington to let the value of the greenback crumble to support US exports .
“ Trade wars have been in place for quite a little while . The difference is the US troops are now coming to the ramparts . ” — US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, staunchly defending new US tariffs on solar panels and large washing machines , which have angered China and South Korea .
“ It’ s so easy to launch a trade war , but it’ s so difficult to stop the disaster of this war . Don ’ t use trade as a weapon , use trade as a solution to solve problems . ” — Alibaba boss Jack Ma , a Davos regular , firing back at the Trump administration .
“ I will be glad to see the Lady May , because Margaret Thatcher was good to us . May is good to us , all the British male prime ministers were not . ” —
Zimbabwe ’s new president , Emmerson Mnangagwa , ahead of bilateral talks on Thursday with British Prime Minister Theresa May.
“ Please … do not pity me , I ’ m not to be pitied . ” — German Chancellor Angela Merkel, responding to concern by World Economic Forum head Klaus Schwab, as the woman who was once Europe ’ s unrivalled leader struggles to form a coalition government in Berlin .
“ France is back at the core of Europe . ” — French President Emmanuel Macron , speaking in English , before switching to French to outline his vision of a new “ social compact” for globalisation .