By Philips Sunday

A local branch of the Alternative for Germany (AfD) party has called on the German authority to ban all mosques in the country, according to a leaked draft policy of the party.

The 45-page policy, titled “The Courage to take Responsibility,” explains the need for the ban by saying that Islam contradicts the constitution and “does not belong to Germany,” adding that there must be a reasonable limit to the freedom of religion.

When Article 4 outlining this freedom came into force, no one thought that a religion would encourage crimes and quest for “world domination,” the document stated.

The document also stated that the Koran carries “lies and deception,” stressing that Islam is already dominating 57 out 190 countries in the world.

Mosques promote “not only common prayer, but also the spread of Islamic teachings directed towards the removal of our legal order,” it also said.

The AfD also called on the German authority to ban construction of new mosques in the country, as they stressed that “Islam does not belong in Germany.”

The populist Alternative for Germany group from Lower Bavaria also rejects the minaret, which is a symbol of Islamic domination, as is the muezzin call, according to which there is no god but Allah,” the manifesto says. “The minaret and the muezzin are in conflict with a tolerant co-existence of religions, which the Christian churches have practiced in modern times.”

The AfD also wants to ban burqas and niqabs in public and to restrict the foreign influence of Islam in Germany by requiring imams to be taught only in German at German universities.

AfD leader Frauke Petry.
AfD leader Frauke Petry.

The AfD’s extremist faction, which calls itself “the Wing,” is thought to be responsible for the draft policy, and Bavaria’s AfD leader Petr Bystron distanced himself from the proposal, but admitted he knew about it.

Bryston maintained that the draft policy was a counter-proposal to the official draft manifesto released by the national AfD last week, several of whose points the Wing opposed, adding that the specific local group that drew up the policy statement, from the Lower Bavaria region, had a “certain affiliation” with the Wing.